Washington news March 26

By Charlotte Henderson | Mar 26, 2020

Not gone, but different

Most of our little town’s activities are cancelled, postponed, in limbo or some other place. The town office is closed to the public but staff is on duty and will help us by phone 845-2897 or email townclerk@fairpoint.net during regular hours.

Select Board meeting are closed to the public. If you want to bring something to the board, call the town office. Municipal voting, set for March 27, and Town meeting, set for March 28, are postponed. Rec Committee Retreat will be rescheduled.

Basic needs

Town officials and concerned citizens are working on some way for those who have extra to share with those who don’t have enough. At this writing, this is a work in progress but by the time you read this, there should be information available at the town office and on the town website at washington.maine.gov.

Revised schedule at WGS

New store hours are in effect at Washington General: six days a week, Monday through Saturday 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thanks for your patience while we figure this all out.

Delivery from WGS

Washington General Store is open and Sean, Amy and the crew are encouraging everyone to use their new delivery option or curb side pick-up. Minimum delivery order is $25 and delivery is free within 10 miles from store.

For curbside pick up, drive to their parking area, phone that you’re there, and they will bring your stuff to your car. To place an order, phone 845-2007 or email wgsmaine@gmail.com and pay with your card.

Jackson’s Corner Store

Washington’s biggest and best gas station and much more, Jackson’s Corner Store is open their regular hours 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

My big question: is postal mail a germ carrier?

Probably not, according to several online statements attributed to the CDC. My own inquiry led me to heavy.com/news/2020/03/coronavirus-shut-down-mail-delivery/ which has a description of how long different surfaces retain the live virus.

Be sure to check your own trusted sources – I’m sharing, not advising.

Scams will blossom

Charity Navigator, an organization that evaluates U.S. charities, points to disasterphilanthropy.org as one that’s aimed particularly at raising money for unexpected situations.

It has a track record of doing that, so we can know a fundraiser is not a scam. Legitimate charities have certain legal hoops to jump through, so we should be able to find some kind of presence online. Medicare has sent out a message that this pandemic will bring out scammers asking for your i.d. info. Legitimate agencies do not call you up to get your info.

They have it already, remember. Do not be fooled.

Thank you, Dr. Semmelweis

If you are a Google search engine user you will recognize this subject of March 20 Google Doodle: 9to5google.com/2020/03/19/ignaz-semmelweis-doodle-wash-your-hands.

This is a clever illustration of effective hand-washing. Almost as importantly, it introduced me to Ignaz Semmelweis, the physician who, in the mid-1800s, brought the practice of hand-washing to midwives and physicians in maternity hospitals in Hungary.

His story is remarkable and tragic in that doctors didn’t accept the practice. Midwives did, and thereby saved many women from unnecessary death from infection.

There are numerous sites telling Dr. Semmelweis’ story now since Covid-19 has raised handwashing to international fame and exultation.

Washington lakes ice-out

Almost in appreciation of spring, ice-out on Washington’s two “great ponds” was observed March 21.

For Washington Pond and Crystal Lake, this date is early for ice-out with previous years usually occurring in April with the exception of 2016 when it was March 11. Ice out is the time when a craft can pass from one end of the lake to the other without encountering ice.

Washington Pond, Crystal Lake and Spring Pond (aka Muddy Pond ) are “great ponds” defined in Maine as water bodies that are 10 acres surface or larger.

The Vernal Equinox and first day of spring happened March 19 which was cloudy. So, I missed my practice of photographing the sunset just as the big orange ball sits on the horizon. I do that every spring because I’m told that on the Equinox the sun rises due east and sets due west and I like to record it. The clouds finally went away and I got my photo on the 21.

March 19 is the earliest start to spring since 1896. Through some quirks of nature and the calendar, the equinox will keep getting earlier for a while, then jolt back. I’m in the process of trying to figure it out and will let you know if I succeed.

Meanwhile, happy spring. It’s still a beautiful world.

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