Town may offer structure to public

By Louis Bettcher | Feb 13, 2018
Photo by: Louis Bettcher A view of the property at 647 Rockland Street in Rockport.

Rockport — Members of the Rockport Select Board met on Feb. 13 and discussed offering the sale and removal of an unused structure on a town-owned property to the public.

The structure, which appears to be a two-story home, sits on a parcel of land at 647 Rockland Street, which abuts the George A. Parker Fire Station in at the intersection of Routes 17 and 90 in West Rockport. The town acquired the property in anticipation of renovations and the possible expansion of the station, but in order to complete any construction the structure in question would need to be removed or demolished.

The board had previously considered the demolition of the building or having the Rockport Fire Department use the structure to conduct a controlled burn. On Monday night they considered a proposal from Rockport resident Dave Herrick to remove the structure and bring it onto his property, located approximately a quarter of a mile away.

Herrick said that he was prepared to remove the structure using his own equipment, thereby not costing the town any money to conduct a demolition or removal if they were to engage the Public Works department. Selectman Owen Casas said that an additional benefit of Herrick taking the structure was that it would be reused and, once placed on Herrick's property, could be taxed by the town. Another possibility if Herrick removes the structure is that he would fill-in the building's foundation -- something that would not be accomplished by a controlled burn or demolition.

"You'd be moving a house on two really busy roads, but the idea is that [Herrick] would take the building off the property. We have no use for the building. The building that we would potentially have a use for is the garage on the property, because we're storing equipment there," said Town Manager Rick Bates.

Chairman Ken McKinley said that the transaction of an individual taking the structure, if it were to remain intact, represents the sale of property, and a nominal amount of money would need to be paid by Herrick or any other individual in order to take ownership of it. In addition, the sale or offer of the building to the public would require a town vote, appearing in June as a town meeting article. McKinley added that it would be important to make the availability of the structure known to all Rockport residents.

"Certainly it seems as though we could advertise for proposals to remove the house and make a decision based on the proposals that come in. And if [Herrick's] proposal says 'I'll take the house and do all this and give you a dollar for it,' that's fine. My guess is that there aren't a lot of people who have a piece of property in the proximity that you do," said McKinley. He said that from the town's point of view it is important that the property is not left in a hazardous condition.

Last November, Rockport Fire Chief Jason Peasley presented two options to the Select Board for renovating the West Rockport fire station.The options ranged in cost between approximately $161,000 and $400,000.

Both options would involve repairing the station's roof. The $161,000 plan, Option 1, would also involve expanding the existing truck bay that houses fire engines. Mitchell reported that currently there is only six inches of extra space available -- four at the front and two at the rear of the bay -- in which to park one of the town's fire trucks.

Option 1 was originally estimated to cost approximately $85,000, but this figure was increased to $161,000 following the purchase of a small parcel of land on an adjacent property to provide room for the bay expansion, as well as the estimate for roof work. The roof replacement plan was approved during a capital improvement process last year. At that time, funds were set aside to cover approximately $120,000 of the work.

The $400,000 option would involve removing the existing fire engine bay, along with the center segment of the fire station, which comprises an office, bathroom and kitchenette that currently has a basement under it. In its place would be built two truck bays of adequate size for two of the town's engines.

Comments (2)
Posted by: Michelle Hannan | Feb 14, 2018 19:19

Great idea!!!



Posted by: Alison S McKellar | Feb 13, 2018 12:38

This is great! It used to be such a common thing to move buildings from one property to another. Many of the buildings around town have been in more than one place. The Smiling Cow and the former Francine are two examples. From an environmental persective, this is one of the best ways to reduce our carbon footprint and overall impact; by reusing and repurposing what we already have rather than forever investing in demolition, disposal, and new construction. They say "the greenest building is the one that's already built" and I think we often lose sight of this in our frenzy to build new super modern energy efficient structures that don't last half as long and often are made with materials imported from all over the world and with questionable practices.

 



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