Submissions for the 2019 Fellowship Award in the Visual Arts now open

Sep 05, 2019
From left are Laura Phipps, Thomas J. Lax and Kathryn Kraczon.

MAINE — The Ellis-Beauregard Foundation is pleased to announce it is now accepting submissions to the 2019 Fellowship Award in the Visual Arts for Maine artists. The award is $25,000 and is paired with a solo exhibition at the Center for Maine Contemporary Art in 2021. The only criterion is artistic excellence and you may apply through submittable.com or go through ellis-beauregardfoundation.com. The deadline is December 1, 2019.

Esteemed jurors are:

Laura Phipps is an assistant curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art. She has been at the Whitney since the summer of 2009, and her recent projects include "Virginia Overton: Sculpture Gardens," "Open Plan: Andrea Fraser" and a group show of emerging artists "Flatlands." She has also co-curated a project with Michele Abeles and the permanent collection exhibition "TestPattern." Phipps has assisted with numerous museum exhibitions, including "2010," the Whitney Biennial, "Legacy: The Emily Fisher Landau Collection," "Glenn Ligon: AMERICA," "Singular Visions, Wade Guyton OS," "Sinister Pop" and "Jeff Koons: A Retrospective." She has served on the grant selection committee of the Rema Hort Mann Foundation, as a visiting critic for the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council Workspace and Smackmellon Studio Program, and as a guest curator at the Kentler Drawing Center, Brooklyn. Prior to the Whitney, Phipps worked in the curatorial department and director’s office of the Modern Art Museum, Fort Worth. She received her MA, Art History at Hunter College, CUNY and BFA, Studio Art and BS, Psychology from Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, Texas.

Thomas J. Lax is Associate Curator of Media and Performance Art at MoMA, a position he’s held since 2014. At the museum, he has organized or co-organized projects including "Steffani Jemison: Promise Machine," "Greater New York 2015," "Maria Hassabi: PLASTIC," "Projects: Neïl Beloufa," and "Modern Dance: Ralph Lemon," among others. Previously, he worked at the Studio Museum in Harlem for seven years where he worked on exhibitions such as "Kalup Linzy: If it Don’t Fit," "VideoStudio," "Fore" and "When the Stars Begin to Fall: Imagination and the American South." Lax writes regularly for a variety of publications and is a faculty member at the Institute for Curatorial Practice in Performance at Wesleyan University’s Center for the Arts. He is also on the advisory committees of Contemporary And, The Laundromat Project, Recess, Vera List Center for Arts and Politics, among others. Lax holds degrees from Brown University and Columbia University and in 2015 was awarded the Walter Hopps Award for Curatorial Achievement.

Kathryn Kraczon comes to the Bell Gallery at Brown University from the Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania, where she held the position of Laporte Associate Curator and organized more than 30 exhibitions. At ICA since 2008, Kraczon championed emerging artists, notably curating "Alex Da Corte and Jayson Musson: Easternsports" (2014) and "Basel Abbas and Ruanne Abou-Rahme: The Incidental Insurgents" (2015), as well as solo exhibitions by artists such as Karla Black, Suki Seokyeong Kang, and Becky Suss. Her most recent exhibition, "Ree Morton: The Plant That Heals May Also Poison," is a reassessment of the work of the innovative feminist artist who died in 1977 at the age of 41. The show was awarded a commendation by the inaugural Sotheby’s Prize, for an “exhibition that breaks new ground,” and was featured in Artforum’s “Best of 2018” issue. It will be presented at the Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College in the fall 2019 and travels to the Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles in 2020.

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