Shell-shedding protesters cause stir during festival

By Daniel Dunkle | Aug 02, 2017
Photo by: Daniel Dunkle Bianca Giron of Bangor, left, and Mary Ann Persad of Brooklyn, N.Y., pretend to be lobsters boiled in a pot Aug. 2 at the corner of Park and Main streets. This was part of the annual PETA protest of the practice of eating lobsters.

Rockland — Two scantily clad PETA protesters drew attention from crowds on their way to the Maine Lobster Festival Aug. 2 at the corner of Park and Main streets.

Bianca Giron of Bangor and Mary Ann Persad of Brooklyn, N.Y., wore red body paint and fake lobster claws and posed as a pair of lobsters in a boiling pot. A similar demonstration took place at the same corner during last year's lobster festival.

The event was organized by PETA campaigner Katerina Davidovich of Los Angeles.

"Scientists have determined that lobsters feel pain," she said. "They feel every moment of their slow, painful deaths. ... Most people would never dream of boiling to death a dog or a cat, but it's just as cruel to boil a lobster."

She said PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) hopes people will adopt a vegan diet to avoid killing any animals for food, adding that eating meat is unnecessary.

The protester also said that lobsters are individuals with thoughts, feelings and personalities.

Asked about the fact that Midcoast Maine's economy depends on the lobster industry, she argued that ending the boiling of lobsters is a moral imperative. Compromises such as killing lobsters more painlessly before boiling them do not go far enough, according to PETA.

"We hope we will evolve as a society to the point where people don't need to earn their living killing living animals," she said.

Maine's 6,000 licensed lobster fishermen hauled in a record 130 million pounds of lobster at a value of $533 million in 2016, according to the Portland Press Herald. That's 75 percent of the state's total commercial fishing value, but does not include the $19 million from the Atlantic herring industry, which provides bait for lobster traps, nor does it take into account other local businesses supporting the lobster industry, including those who sell and service boats, sell gear, buy lobster and serve the crustacean to tourists in restaurants.

As the protest was taking place, the 70th annual Maine Lobster Festival, featuring games, rides, activities and, of course, the big tent full of people eating lobster, was getting under way across the street. Each year the event draws thousands of tourists to the area from all over the country and the world.

PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) stages a protest as the Maine Lobster Festival begins Aug. 2 in Rockland. (Photo by: Daniel Dunkle)
Two PETA protesters draw attention as crowds pass on the busy Rockland street on their way to the 70th Maine Lobster Festival. Several people stopped to have their pictures taken with the protesters. (Photo by: Daniel Dunkle)
Comments (8)
Posted by: Holly Ann Tracy | Aug 03, 2017 14:12

Imagine if these silly people put that energy into a less naïve cause, such as education.  Or Global warming.  How many tons of carbon did they expend coming to Maine to show off?



Posted by: Allen Mitchell | Aug 03, 2017 08:11

Maybe they should lead the parade and see what happens.....



Posted by: Susan Vanorse | Aug 03, 2017 07:31

Hope the red dye is plant based!



Posted by: Mark Haskell | Aug 02, 2017 22:33

People Eating Tasty Animals  Sounds Good to ME!



Posted by: Gerald A Weinand | Aug 02, 2017 18:38

Who boils lobster? Steaming cooks them just as well while using a helluvalot less energy.



Posted by: David E Myslabodski | Aug 02, 2017 16:17

Hi there D V

 

No can do! These are not Food Grade chemicals.



Posted by: Dave Vangel | Aug 02, 2017 15:10

When I eat lobster I typically prepare as follows.  Prior to boiling, I first insert an intravenous needle into the first knuckle above the crusher claw. I then begin a drip of sodium thiopental to induce unconsciousness, followed by pancuronium bromide to cause muscle paralysis and respiratory arrest, and finally potassium chloride to stop the heart. I then use a stethoscope to determine if death has occurred. Once I have determined the crustacean has left the building, I gently drop the remains into boiling water with a life preserver (just in case).



Posted by: Mary A McKeever | Aug 02, 2017 14:25

Well all animals feel pain when prepared for eating. One must terminate the cow for steaks. One must terminate chickens to enjoy country fried delights. Perhaps we all should just become vegetarians?



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