‘Lobster War’ with Canada in documentary

Jul 11, 2019
A scene from "Lobster War."

CAMDEN — On Tuesday, July 23, at 7 p.m. the Camden Public Library, 55 Main St., screens "Lobster War," the must-watch, award-winning feature-length documentary film about a conflict between the United States and Canada over waters that both countries have claimed since the end of the Revolutionary War.

The disputed 277 square miles of sea known as the Gray Zone, located in the waters between Maine and Nova Scotia, were traditionally fished by U.S. lobstermen. As the Gulf of Maine has warmed faster than nearly any other body of water on the planet, the area’s previously modest lobster population has surged. As a result, Canadians have begun to assert their sovereignty, warring with the Americans to claim the bounty. “Lobster War” (2018, USA) is directed by David Abel, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter at The Boston Globe, and Andy Laub, an award-winning documentarian, producers of the acclaimed Discovery channel documentary "Sacred Cod.” The film is unrated and runs 74 minutes.

Anyone who has lived along the coast of Maine knows that distinguishing local lobstering territories can be a delicate and turbulent process. The consequences of violating territorial demarcations can range from benign to deadly. The stakes become even higher when disputes erupt in international waters where allies can quickly turn into enemies.

“Wonderful personal interviews… An in-depth look at the lobster’s journey from catch to table. This documentary does a beautiful job of encapsulating all of the issues at hand within the Machias Seal Island waters and what is personally at stake for all those involved.” said Ken Severance-Camo, New Hampshire Film Festival. David Abel, the film’s director, will answer questions via Skype following the film. For more information, visit the events calendar at librarycamden.org.

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