Farnsworth exhibits Nevelson works from Saint Peter’s Church in NYC

Apr 12, 2019
Photo by: Thomas Magno Photography “Trinity” as part of the complete sculptural environment titled “Chapel of the Good Shepherd” located within Saint Peter’s Church.

ROCKLAND — The Farnsworth Art Museum, 16 Museum St., announces the temporary installation of three works by American sculptor Louise Nevelson. Entitled “Trinity,” the works are part of the complete sculptural environment the artist titled “Chapel of the Good Shepherd” located within Saint Peter’s Church in New York City. Nevelson Chapel is currently undergoing renovation, allowing these three elements to be on view in the Farnsworth’s Micah Gallery through September 22, when they will be reunited once renovations are completed. At the Farnsworth, “Trinity” is shown with two other Nevelson works from the museum’s collection, “Endless Column,” one of her wall pieces; and a rare surviving example of her design for a St. Louis Opera Company set.

Commissioned by Saint Peter’s Church for midtown Manhattan’s ground-breaking corporate/ church/ public complex known as Citigroup Center, Nevelson Chapel is the artist’s only remaining complete environment open to the public. It is unique among Nevelson’s publicly accessible intact room-sized installations. One of a handful of sacred spaces in the world conceived by great artists of the 20th century — Pierre Matisse, Mark Rothko and Nevelson — it is the only such space in New York City. Restoration of this New York City treasure hidden in plain sight will preserve an important piece of cultural heritage for the future and further Nevelson’s legacy as one of the most influential and celebrated sculptors of the 20th century.

Nevelson is recognized for revolutionizing artists’ ideas of what sculpture could be. Born in present-day Ukraine in 1899, her family fled pogroms and persecution, and eventually settled as immigrants in Rockland in 1905. She grew up in Rockland and attended Rockland High School where she studied art and was captain of the basketball team. She moved to New York City in 1920 and had her first solo exhibition in 1941. Nevelson was one of the first recipients of the National Medal of the Arts, bestowed on her in 1985 by President Ronald Reagan to honor her creative genius and personal achievement.

The Farnsworth Art Museum is home to one of the largest public collections of the works of Louise Nevelson. The museum is currently open to the public Tuesdays through Sundays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. On June 1, the Farnsworth will resume summer hours: Open 7 days, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, visit www.farnsworthmuseum.org.

Courier Publications’ A&E Editor Christine Dunkle can be reached at (207) 594-4401, ext. 108; or arts@villagesoup.com.

Comments (0)
If you wish to comment, please login.