Congratulations on new Mid-Coast School of Technology

By The Courier-Gazette Editorial Board | Sep 12, 2019

The grand opening and ribbon-cutting at the new Mid-Coast School of Technology in Rockland was a tremendous milestone for the community this week.

This school has been a valuable and under-appreciated resource since it opened in 1976, and with this new, beautiful building, it will be in an even better position to carry out its mission.

The school offers hands-on training directly related to the future careers of its students. Programs range from those in construction and auto repair to health care, communications, machine-tool, welding, hospitality, design and many other fields.

The school serves 320 students daily and another 140 through satellite programs. There are 21 communities served by Region 8 from Islesboro to Newcastle.

More than ever, this real-world, practical training is vital for students who plan to go on to higher education after high school and those who want to dive right into the work force. As students attending universities and colleges face a growing debt crisis, programs like this serve to bridge the gap and create opportunities.

The new building looks wonderful and all of those involved in the effort to make this a reality deserve a great deal of credit. Kudos are also in order for the students who designed the mural that decorates the new building.

We look forward to seeing great things from the staff and students.

This day in history

Sept. 12, 1940

Near Montignac, France, a collection of prehistoric cave paintings are discovered by four teenagers who stumbled upon the ancient artwork after following their dog down a narrow entrance into a cavern. The 15,000- to 17,000-year-old paintings, consisting mostly of animal representations, are among the finest examples of art from the Upper Paleolithic period.

First studied by the French archaeologist Henri-Édouard-Prosper Breuil, the Lascaux grotto consists of a main cavern 66 feet wide and 16 feet high. The walls of the cavern are decorated with some 600 painted and drawn animals and symbols and nearly 1,500 engravings. The pictures depict in excellent detail numerous types of animals, including horses, red deer, stags, bovines, feline, and what appear to be mythical creatures. There is only one human figure depicted in the cave: a bird-headed man with an erect phallus. Archaeologists believe the cave was used over a long period of time as a center for hunting and religious rites.

The Lascaux grotto was opened to the public in 1948, but was closed in 1963 because artificial lights had faded the vivid colors of the paintings and caused algae to grow over some of them. A replica of the Lascaux cave was opened nearby in 1983 and receives tens of thousands of visitors annually.

Sept. 13, 1993

After decades of bloody animosity, representatives of Israel and Palestine meet on the South Lawn of the White House and sign a framework for peace. The “Declaration of Principles” was the first agreement between the Israelis and Palestinians towards ending their conflict and sharing the holy land between the River Jordan and the Mediterranean Sea that they both claim as their homeland.

At the White House that day, Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres and PLO foreign policy official Mahmoud Abbas signed the Declaration of Principles on Interim Self-Government Arrangements. President Bill Clinton presided over the ceremony, and more than 3,000 onlookers, including former presidents George H.W. Bush and Jimmy Carter, watched in amazement as Arafat and Rabin sealed the agreement with a handshake. The old bitter enemies had met for the first time at a White House reception that morning.

In his remarks, Rabin, a former top-ranking Israeli army general, told the crowd: “We the soldiers who have returned from the battle stained with blood; we who have seen our relatives and friends killed before our eyes; we who have fought against you, the Palestinians; we say to you today in a loud and clear voice: Enough of blood and tears. Enough!” And Arafat, the guerrilla leader who for decades was targeted for assassination by Israeli agents, declared that “The battle for peace is the most difficult battle of our lives. It deserves our utmost efforts because the land of peace yearns for a just and comprehensive peace.”

Despite attempts by extremists on both sides to sabotage the peace process with violence, the Israelis completed their withdrawal from the Gaza Strip and Jericho in May 1994. In July, Arafat entered Jericho amid much Palestinian jubilation and set up his government – the Palestinian Authority. In October 1994, Arafat, Yitzhak Rabin, and Shimon Peres were jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts at reconciliation.

In September 1995, Rabin, Arafat, and Peres signed a peace agreement providing for the expansion of Palestinian self-rule in the West Bank and for democratic elections to determine the leadership of the Palestinian Authority. Just over a month later, on Nov. 4, 1995, Rabin was assassinated by a Jewish extremist at a peace rally in Tel Aviv.

Source: History.com

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