Ten Maine men, three of them from the Midcoast, are being honored in hometown ceremonies Oct. 2-8 for their participation in the Boston Tea Party Dec. 16, 1773.

Commemorative plaques will be placed on the gravestones of Gershom Collier of Northport Oct. 4, and Benjamin Burton of Warren and John Cochran of Belfast, both on Oct. 5. Local officials and patriotic organizations are joining in the ceremonies, and the public is welcome.

To date, 104 commemorative markers have been placed at the graves of known Boston Tea Party participants by the Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum and Revolution 250, a consortium of organizations working together to commemorate the 250th anniversaries of events that led to the American Revolution.

The organizations’ goal is for all known Boston Tea Party participants to receive markers by the 250th anniversary of the Tea Party next year.

Those being honored this week in Maine, with biographical notes furnished by Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum, are:

David Decker, who was honored Sunday, Oct. 2, with a graveside ceremony at 11:30 a.m. in Baker Cemetery, Moscow. Decker was born in 1719 in New Hampshire and was 54 years old when he participated in the Boston Tea Party. He married Eunice (née Row) in 1741 and they were early setters on Cape Newagen Island, at what has since been known as Decker’s Cove. They had six children. He died in Moscow in 1809.

John Crane, to be honored Monday, Oct. 3 at a 1 p.m. ceremony in Whiting Village Cemetery, 7 No. Main St., Whiting. Crane was born in 1744 in Boston and worked as a housewright. He was 29 when he participated in the Boston Tea Party, where, in the hold of a ship, he was knocked unconscious be a crate of tea that fell on him.  Taking him for dead, others hid his body under a pile of wood shavings in a carpenter’s shop near the wharf, where he recovered. He married in 1766 and had six children. Crane went on to serve in the Revolutionary War where he rose to brigadier general. He settled in Whiting following the war, where he owned a plot of land on Moose Island and built the first sawmill in Whiting in 1785. He died in Whiting in 1805.

Gershom Collier, who will be honored Tuesday, Oct. 4, at 11 a.m. at Collier Cemetery on the Wyman Blueberry Farm off Beech Hill Road in Northport. Collier was born in 1738 in Scituate, Massachusetts. He was 35 when he participated in the Boston Tea Party. He probably was a Freemason. In 1783, he married Abigail (née Nash) and they had three children. He died in Northport in 1822.

Benjamin Burton of Warren will be honored Wednesday, Oct. 5, 11 a.m., at his grave site in Fairview Cemetery, Patterson Mill Road, Warren. Burton was born in 1749 in Thomaston. At age 24, he happened to be in Boston on a visit and participated in the Boston Tea Party. He served in the Revolutionary War as an officer and was a prisoner of war for four months. In 1779, he married Hannah (née Chruch) and had one child.  After the war, he was a magistrate and was often a member of the Legislature. He died in Warren in 1835.

John Cochran of Belfast will be honored Wednesday, Oct. 5, 3:30 p.m., at a ceremony in Grove Cemetery, Belfast. Cochran was born in 1749 in East Boston, Massachusetts. He was 24 when he participated in the Boston Tea Party. He served in the Revolutionary War as a soldier at the Battle of Bunker Hill. He married Mary (née Adams) and they had two children. He died in Belfast in 1839.

James Starr and Jonathan Parker will be honored Thursday, Oct. 6, at 11 a.m. in a ceremony in Jay Hill Cemetery, corner of Main Street and Cemetery Road in Jay. Starr was born in 1740 in New London, Connecticut. He was 33 when he participated in the Boston Tea Party. He served in the Revolutionary War as a minuteman at the time of the Battle of Lexington and as a private. He married Mary (née Winters) and had four children. He settled in Jay on Jay Hill in 1802 and served as town selectman, clerk and treasurer. He died in Jay in 1835.

Parker was born in 1728 in Roxbury, Massachusetts and was a farmer. He was 45 when he participated in the Boston Tea Party. During the Revolutionary War, he was one of the soldiers who successfully took cannons from the British at the Battle of Bunker Hill. He married twice, first to Abigail (née Baker), then following her death, to Hannah (née unknown) and had 13 children between both marriages.  He died in Jay in 1801.

James Mills of Bethel will be honored Thursday, Oct. 6, at 3:30 p.m. at his grave in Skillingston Cemetery, 24 Annis Road, Bethel. Mills was born in Needham, Massachusetts, in 1750. He was 23 when he participated in the Boston Tea Party. He married Hannah (née Grover) and they had five children. He died in Canton in 1790.

Joseph Ludden of Canton will be honored Friday, Oct. 7, at an 11 a.m. ceremony in Turner Centerville Cemetery, Turner Center Road, Turner. Ludden was born in 1753 in Braintree, Massachusetts, and was a blacksmith. He was 20 when he participated in the Boston Tea Party. He married Sarah (née Brown) and they had four children. He died in Canton in 1829.

Ephraim Smith will be honored Saturday, Oct. 8, in a private ceremony at noon on private property in Gorham. Smith was born in 1751 in Eastham, Massachusetts, and was a sailor. He was 22 when he participated in the Boston Tea Party. He married Elizabeth (née Harding) in 1773 (nine months prior to the destruction of the tea) and they had nine children. He was a mariner and when he and his family settled in Gorham, he became a captain. He died in Gorham in 1835.

The ceremonies will include remarks by Evan O’Brien, Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum creative manager, and comments by Jonathan Lane, Revolution 250 coordinator for the Massachusetts Historical Society. A costumed actor will place the commemorative gravestone markers.

The image depicted on the commemorative marker is inspired by Nathaniel Currier’s “The Destruction of the Tea at Boston Harbor” lithograph created in 1846, a popular and often-used artistic representation of The Boston Tea Party. The markers will be on display indefinitely.

To date, a total of 104 commemorative markers have been placed at graves of known Boston Tea Party participants buried within some of New England’s oldest burying grounds. Plaques have been placed in the following Massachusetts cemeteries: Ancient Cemetery (Yarmouth), Blandford Burying Ground (Blandford), Broad Street Cemetery (Salem), Center Cemetery (Harvard), Central Burying Ground (Boston Common), Chandler Hill Cemetery (Colrain), Cohasset Central Cemetery (Cohasset), Common Street Cemetery (Watertown), Copp’s Hill Burying Ground (Boston), East Parish Burying Ground (Newton), Fuller Cemetery (Ludlow), Granary Burying Ground (Boston), Harmony Grove Cemetery (Salem), Hope Cemetery (Worcester), King’s Chapel Burying Ground (Boston), Old Burying Ground (Gardner), Pine Grove Cemetery (Lynn) and Sears Cemetery (Brewster).

Markers have also been placed at Bantam Burying Ground (Bantam, Connecticut), Greenwood Cemetery (St. Albans, Vermont), Horse Meadow Cemetery (Haverhill, New Hampshire), Lakeview Cemetery (Wolfeboro, New Hampshire), West Fairlee Village Cemetery (West Fairlee, Vermont) and West Wardsboro Cemetery (Wardsboro, Vermont).

The organizers are creating a series of commemorative programs throughout 2023, culminating in a grand-scale, live reenactment celebrating the 250th anniversary of the Boston Tea Party on Saturday, Dec. 16, 2023.  Details will be updated and posted to BostonTeaParty250.com.  Instagram/Facebook: @bostonteaparty250.