While its physical doors are temporarily closed, the Strand Theatre continues to offer a weekly schedule of new release films that viewers can watch through online streaming platforms. By purchasing a “virtual ticket,” movie fans can still see the films that would have shown at the theater. Ticket proceeds are split between the Strand and the movie distribution company, so a viewer’s purchase is a simple and direct way to provide much-needed support for the theater.

Showing Oct. 2 through 8 is "Entangled," a new film about how climate change has accelerated a collision between one of the world’s most endangered species, North America’s most valuable fishery, and a federal agency mandated to protect both. The film, by the makers of "Lobster War" and "Sacred Cod," was named a finalist for a 2020 Jackson Wild award, known as the Oscars of nature films.

There are now believed to be fewer than 400 right whales, making them among the planet’s most endangered species. The main threat to their survival, scientists say: millions of lobster lines that stretch from New England up through Atlantic Canada, standard gear for North America’s most valuable fishery. Exacerbating that threat is climate change, which has sparked a collapse in the whale’s food supply in the warming waters of the Gulf of Maine, forcing them to search for food in areas where they had rarely been seen before. As a result, their population has been plummeting. In recent years, deaths of right whales have spiked while births have fallen sharply. In 2018, no calves were born — an unprecedented observation — while the previous year, a record 17 were found dead. In 2019, 10 right whales died, the second most ever recorded. NOAA officials say the population can’t sustain more than a single premature death a year. At the current rate of decline, scientists say the whales could go extinct within 20 years. Now, under pressure from lawsuits by environmental advocates to reduce right whale deaths, the federal government has been considering controversial regulations that pit the region’s politically powerful lobstermen against scientists and environmental advocates trying to save the whales. The proposed regulations, which could reduce lobster lines by half in much of the Gulf of Maine and harm the livelihoods of many lobstermen, has sparked a political backlash. The future of the iconic species hangs in the balance.

Directed by David Abel and Andy Laub. The film is not rated. Running time: 1 hour, 15 min.

Virtual tickets will be available on the Strand Theatre website during the film’s screening dates. Once viewers have purchased a ticket, they will have several days in which to watch the film.

For more information, visit rocklandstrand.com, email info@rocklandstrand.com, or call (207) 594-0070.