Send off the season with a bang at Polly’s Folly Fall Regatta

Sailors, kayakers, power boat lovers and anyone else who likes messing around in boats are invited to watch and/or participate in the annual Polly’s Folly Fall Regatta this Saturday, Oct. 8 on Megunticook Lake in Camden.

The first gun will be at 1:30 p.m. The beach party and awards presentation begins around 4 p.m. at Polly’s Folly at 159 Beaucaire Ave. Organizers will provide cider and a grill. You bring your own drinks and food.

All small boats, sail or paddle, are welcome — Lasers, Blue Jays, Optimists, Sunfishes, kayaks, canoes, peapods, rowing shells, etc.

Spectator outboard boats are encouraged. The regatta headquarters is at 159 Beaucaire Ave., at Polly’s Folly. Launching will be at Barrett’s Cove launching ramp off of Route 52. Small boat launching at regatta site, as well. The proposed course is a circumnavigation of Crane Island and Fang Island.

 

 

 

Camden third best foliage town in New England

Camden has been named the third best foliage town in New England, up from sixth in 2010, according to a poll conducted on YankeeFoliage.com, Yankee Magazine’s fall foliage website. Experts say: “A seaside town located in the ‘jewel’ of Maine’s Midcoast has everything a visitor is looking for, color intensity against the backdrop of the rocky coast, scenic drives, hikes and a whole host of outdoor recreation — adding to that world class dining, lodging, shopping and cultural venues that make Camden and the communities of the Camden Hills definite not-to-miss fall favorites. The voting took place from mid-August and ended on Sept. 28.”

To qualify, tourism professionals, along with some of Yankee Magazine’s writers and editors, determined the Top 25 Foliage Towns in New England. Towns were then scored on a scale from 0 to 5 in 14 areas that make up the perfect fall foliage travel destination: color intensity, scenery, vistas, nearby water, scenic drives, hikes, culture, farmers’ markets and farm stands, orchards, covered bridges, state or local parks, the quality and variety of shops to browse, tourism amenities such as hotels and restaurants.

 

 

Oh, really?

From an observant reader: “Came across an interesting piece of information yesterday while going through e-newsletters I regularly receive. The item is from National Green Center, which reports on nursery industry news, and stated: ‘L.L. Bean chooses the Cartner’s Blue Ridge Fraser Fir for its Christmas catalog.’ Cartner’s Blue Ridge Fraser Fir is in Newland, North Carolina. That would mean Bean’s fir Christmas trees this year are grown in North Carolina, not Maine. Well…at least they are not from China. (Hey! But that could be China, Maine!)