Waldoboro

The community gathered at the Waldoboro Fire Station on Sunday afternoon to mark the 10th anniversary of 9/11. Firefighters, police officers and emergency medical personnel stood in the late summer sun with the ambulances and firetrucks.

“We assemble together to reflect on the horrific events of Sept. 11, 2001, and remember the determination and heroic efforts of the firefighters, police officers and medical responders that vigilantly worked so the sacrifice of those who lost all would not have done so in vain,” said Fire Chief Paul Smeltzer.

Waldoboro first responders and community members honored the memory of those who died on 9/11: the 246 who died aboard airplanes, 2,606 in the World Trade Center, and 125 at the Pentagon — of those were 343 firefighters, 60 police officers, and eight medical responders.

“On Sept. 11, 2001, the entire world watched true American heroes — the everyday firefighters, police officers and EMTs as they ran in to save those who could not run out,” Smeltzer said. “It is in their memory we have gathered here today.”

Later, the bell rang in 3-4-3 sequence, “signifying the 343 FDNY firefighters and paramedics who responded to the attacks and lost their lives trying to rescue their neighbors and complete strangers in New York City on that fateful day,” Smeltzer said.

The remembrance event included bagpipes, the Pledge of Allegiance, a reading, reflections, prayer, music and Taps.

Looking back 10 years: Georges Valley memorial

Albie Davis said in an email: “I came across some photos of the very touching memorial that a teacher and his/her students installed on the Thomaston Mall shortly after the attack on Sept. 11, 2001.  …As I recall, at the time, it was commonly thought that at least 4,000 had died, so 4,000 flags, each with comments by students, were installed.”

Cushing memorial

Joe Yamello of Cushing created a memorial on the lawn of his Cushing Road home.

Lincolnville memorial

On Route 1 in Lincolnville, in the front yard of Don and Debbie Fullington, a memorial was created for the firefighters who lost their lives on Sept. 11, 2001.