In 2007, New York City’s Jewish Museum mounted an major exhibition of Louise Nevelson’s work. The accompanying catalog, originally published in a cloth-bound edition, has been re-issued in paperback and sells for $40.

The book, titled “The Sculpture of Louise Nevelson: Constructing a Legend,” is edited by curator Brooke Kamin Rapaport and contains 177 illustrations, color and black and white. It has four essays on the artist and her work plus commentary by three contemporary sculptors, two presented in a question-and-answer format. The book also offers a year-by-year chronology and listing of shows.

Born in Kiev in 1899 as Leah Berliawsky, Nevelson was part of a Jewish family of middle-class landowners and timber merchant. Nevelson, her mother and two siblings came to the United States in 1905 and joined her father in Rockland, where he worked in construction and established a lumberyard., in 1899 to a Jewish family of upper middle class landowners and timber merchants. Nevelson, her mother and two siblings came to the United States in 1905 and joined her father in Rockland, where he worked in construction and established a lumberyard.

In 1918, Nevelson graduated from high school in Rockland (the building that now houses the Lincoln Street Center for Arts and Education). Two years later, she married Charles Nevelson, son of a wealthy New York shipping family, who had come to Maine on business, and moved to New York.

The book is available online at thejewishmuseum.org and Amazon.com.

VillageSoup Art/Entertainment Editor Dagney Ernest can be reached at 207-594-4401 or by e-mail to dernest@villagesoup.com.