Standing on the curb

By Ken Frederic | Apr 13, 2017

The April Fool’s Day snow lay about 3 inches deep in our driveway when we left Bristol Sunday morning. My aunt had called a week before to tell us that Lewis, my 92-year-old uncle, would be flying to Baltimore with Honor Flight Maine and would return Sunday, April 2.

Lewis is the youngest of seven children born to Lena and Schuyler Higgins. My mother, 10 years his senior, was his only sister. In January of 1943, he left home to report for duty at "Camp Devins," according to Lena’s diary. For the next week, her entries include lines like, “I miss Lewis so much, I just don’t know what to do.” Her entries grow less frequent over the weeks, but in April she notes that Lewis is in the hospital with rheumatic fever. Later that summer she notes that Lewis arrived home on the last train from Bangor.

Despite the weather on Saturday, the roads were clear and mostly dry on the way down to Portland, and just past the Hilton Garden Inn, signs directed us to what is normally the employee parking lot. We received tag number 002 at a little past 10 a.m. Inside the terminal, volunteers were already hard at work. The long red carpet was laid from the arrivals area to the reception area and three women were unpacking T-shirts and hats. We stopped to buy shirts and a hat for me. The ladies remembered Lewis from the Honor Flight departure on Thursday. We took our purchases, bought some unexpectedly good coffee, and sat down for our two- to three-hour wait.

If you’ve been to PWM, you probably know that the seating on the first floor is diabolically designed to discourage lingering, and we shortly found it preferable to stand and chat with others. One woman we met had just arrived from Tampa to surprise her mother, who was on the Honor Flight. We met a young woman who was leaving in a few days to start basic training as a marine. I had the extraordinary privilege of shaking the hands of the Freeport “flag ladies” and thanking them for their example and dedication.

Organizers came by to tell us the flight had arrived as scheduled at 12:30, but, as predicted, it took a full hour to deplane, gather luggage, and assemble the veterans for their “march” down the red carpet behind bagpipers and a color guard. Most of the World War II veterans were in wheelchairs being pushed by their companions for the trip, except for one who insisted on pushing his chair containing only his luggage. There were also veterans of Korea, Vietnam, and Desert Storm. Lewis was one of the last to come by, and he wanted us to know that he didn’t need the wheelchair. The organizers had insisted!

After lunch and a few speeches, we took Lewis to the loading area, and his son got behind the wheel to start the two-hour drive to Dedham. We found our car and left for Bristol with our thoughts:

Only the night before we’d heard that Drexel University Professor George Ciccariello tweeted: “Some guy gave up his first-class seat for a uniformed soldier. People are thanking him. I’m trying not to vomit or yell about Mosul.” Lewis had given us this opportunity do something positive while also demonstrating how vehemently we reject Mr. Ciccariello, the university that enables his hate, and the reprehensible thoughts he harbors.

We noted how blessed we are to have Lewis with us and, while it was our great privilege to greet him, he in fact had given us the greater gift of meeting so many extraordinary, patriotic, fundamentally decent fellow Mainers.

We were reminded that as absurdly divisive as our country has become, America remains fundamentally good, kind, rational and patriotic. Lewis represents what is called the "Greatest Generation," not just because of the sacrifices they made and the heroism of their service to the world. They also returned to set high standards of self-reliance, personal achievement, hard work, charity, morality and responsible parenting.

Their hard work made America educated and prosperous, they cleaned our rivers and the air, and they rejected the discrimination that shamed America for a century after the Civil War. Sadly, it was our generation that followed them, coming of age during the Vietnam era and shamefully setting new standards for enabling and legitimizing every imaginable form of sedition, duplicity, hedonism, depravity, irresponsibility and self-destructive behavior.

Back home, the snow had vanished from our driveway and we let go of the guilt over what we could have done, should have done, but didn’t do. One of the shirts we saw in Portland effectively summed up our musings: “We can’t all be heroes. Some of us get to stand on the curb and clap as they go by.” –Will Rogers

Comments (10)
Posted by: Ronald Horvath | Apr 18, 2017 06:47

Indeed, Maggie.   “Nobody really knows what he’s doing,” Bill Mauldin had written of his first week in combat with the 180th infantry.  Yet other primal lessons also could be gleaned, from Licata to Augusta.  For war was not just a military campaign but also a parable.  There were lessons of camaraderie and duty and inscrutable fate.  There were lessons of honor and courage, of compassion and sacrifice.  And then there was the saddest lesson, to be learned again and again in the coming weeks as they fought across Sicily, and in the coming months as they fought their way back toward a world at peace: that war is corrupting, that it corrodes the soul and tarnishes the spirit, that even the excellent and the superior can be defiled, and that no heart would remain unstained.”  -Rick Atkinson, The Day of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944



Posted by: Maggie Trout | Apr 17, 2017 11:37

Without anyone to sit on the curb to cheer those who fought, there would be no reason for the fight.  Without individuals taking care of the business of war and living, there would be no heroes, and they, too are heroes. Anyone believing that "high standards of self-reliance, personal achievement, hard work, charity, morality and responsible parenting," were set by those who returned, (and returned undamaged psychologically), and not by those who did not don a uniform, has invented a mythology.  These were also the parents of the generation which followed them, and the ones who set the standards for ethics and morality.  Damming entire generations based on mythology is as empty as claiming that all who were part of the so-called "greatest generation" were pure of thought and deed.



Posted by: JUNE DOLCATER | Apr 17, 2017 08:20

To All Far Lefties,

No cure for anger, bitterness, and hatred.  If the shoe fits, wear it.  Nothing like be a loser !!!

Jan Dolcater



Posted by: Harold Bryson Mosher | Apr 17, 2017 05:18

Tell it to Trump, Jan.

 



Posted by: JUNE DOLCATER | Apr 16, 2017 21:50

There are some sicknesses that cannot be cured.  No question about it in regards to several noted above. Very sad and pathetic

Jan Dolcater, Rockport



Posted by: Harold Bryson Mosher | Apr 16, 2017 04:33

I forgot nothing , Dale, and I'm not trying to take anything away from Lewis.  Each generation is a product of its times and to present the "greatest generation" as perfect while denouncing "boomers" as bums is simplistic.  The Hell's Angels began with disaffected veterans of WWII, for example, and Wavy Gravy, about the only hippie left, began and continues to run SEVA, an organization that has saved the sight of millions in South Asia.  If Ken had just made his column about Lewis it would have been fine, but he had to use a life well spent to make a sweeping generalization.  He came across as a fuddy-duddy.



Posted by: Dale E. Landrith Sr. | Apr 15, 2017 07:14

I think you guys forgot this part

"We were reminded that as absurdly divisive as our country has become, America remains fundamentally good, kind, rational and patriotic. Lewis represents what is called the "Greatest Generation," not just because of the sacrifices they made and the heroism of their service to the world. They also returned to set high standards of self-reliance, personal achievement, hard work, charity, morality and responsible parenting."



Posted by: Harold Bryson Mosher | Apr 14, 2017 10:36

I think it would be fair to add narcissism, racism, and misogyny to Trump's list of foibles.

 



Posted by: Ronald Horvath | Apr 14, 2017 06:43

"... they cleaned our rivers and the air, and they rejected the discrimination that shamed America for a century after the Civil War."  Why Ken, you make them all sound like tree-hugging liberals.  You forgot to mention that they also elected Eisenhower who used the high tax rate on the rich to build highways, schools, and a mighty nation with strong unions, a prosperous middle class, and a future of possibilities.  How different from the "sedition, duplicity, hedonism, depravity, irresponsibility and self-destructive behavior" of the age of Trump.



Posted by: Harold Bryson Mosher | Apr 14, 2017 06:07

Yes, "shamefully setting new standards for enabling and legitimizing every imaginable form of sedition, duplicity, hedonism, depravity, irresponsibility and self-destructive behavior," certainly belongs to the generation that came of age during the Vietnam War, not the ones who got it rolling.  Wait Ken, you were describing one person of that generation to a "T," Donald Trump.



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