Charles G. Perry

Jan 14, 2014
Charles G. Perry

Rockport — Charles Guimond Perry, 83, passed surrounded by his loving family at Pen Bay Medical Center.

He was born Sept. 5, 1930, son of Morris Benjamin and Ella May Lewis Perry. Mr. Perry attended local schools, graduating from Rockland High School in 1948 where he played football. Throughout his youth, Charles worked for his father’s M.B. & C.O. Perry Coal Company. Upon graduation, he enlisted in the United States Navy. During the Korean War, Charles served on the flight deck and as a radar operator aboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Franklin Delano Roosevelt stationed in the Mediterranean Sea.

Following his honorable discharge from the Navy, Charles attended the University of Maine at Orono earning a bachelor of science degree. Mr. Perry launched his teaching career at Rockport High School as an instructor of physics and chemistry. He then taught science at Camden High School and, after the consolidation of the area schools, instructed hundreds of students in the sciences for more than 28 years at Camden-Rockport High School, retiring in 1985. Summers, he served as a driver education instructor.

Following retirement, Charles remained engaged in the community, working at the Farnsworth Art Museum and avidly reading local news. Throughout his life, he always enjoyed visiting with former students and learning of their success.

On Dec. 1, 1950, Charles married Gail Green Clark of Rockland. They were married 42 years. The two enjoyed playing duets together, with Gail on the piano and her husband playing the violin. They had four children: Peter Paul Perry, Ingrid Ann Perry, Lisa Ann Pavao, and Teresa Perry Curtis.

An outdoorsman, many of the family’s fondest memories revolved around their time together in the Maine environment. During his college years, Charles owned a lobster boat the Hedonist, lobstering out of Rockland Harbor in the summer months. While raising his growing family, Mr. Perry continued seasonal lobstering. An accomplished scuba diver, Charles often dove for scallops and joined the Blue Fins Scuba Club. He also enjoyed off-road motorcycling, snowmobiling and ice fishing. Building on his expertise in Morse code, he was an accomplished home amateur radio operator, constructing his own equipment and connecting with many stations around the world.

Always in tune with nature and the world around him, Charles enjoyed keeping a large garden with his wife. The family spent joyful summers at their Crawford Pond camp, where many deer and rabbit hunting trips originated. He hunted with his favorite rabbit hound named Colonel. Always having a spot in his heart for his pets, Charles particularly loved his miniature French poodle, Awesome Paris. Throughout his life, a concern for the environment and Maine ecology led him to support many nature conservancy organizations and causes. One of Mr. Perry’s defining passions was world travel. Beginning with his service in the Navy, Charles visited over 23 foreign countries, many in Europe and Africa.

Speaking of their father, Mr. Perry’s children emphasized that he was a devoted father and grampy, in recent years cherishing the relationships he enjoyed with his family. Family gatherings brought particular joy and he was thrilled to be at the center of the recent Christmas gathering. Predeceased by his beloved wife Gail, Sept. 15, 1992, he was exceptionally proud of his family and the accomplishments of his grandchildren.

Charles is survived by four children, nine grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren. His survivors include – Peter Paul Perry and his wife Donna Eaton Perry and their children, Peter Paul Perry II and his fiancée Aiyana Athenian; Matthew Lee Perry, his wife Michelle, and their daughter Vivienne Perry of Rockport; and Joshua M. Perry, his wife Ruthie, and their son Isaiah Perry of Patna, India; Ian Putansu and his children Aubrey and Mae of Portland; and Michelle Upton of Hope. His loving daughter Ingrid Ann Perry of Rockport and her sons H. Timothy Perry, his wife Molly FitzGerald Perry, and Andrew Charles Perry of Tidewater, Va. His daughter Lisa Ann Pavao and her husband Matthew of Orono. And his youngest daughter Teresa Perry Curtis, her husband Norman and their girls Greta Katherine Curtis and Gail Green Lillianna Curtis all of Rockport. Charles also leaves behind a cherished friendship with Donnie Marsh of Middletown, Conn., and predeceased by lifelong friend and cousin Henriella Stiles. Mr. Perry was grateful for the exemplary and compassionate care of his doctors, Eric Schenk and Louis Coyle.

Charles was proud to be a member of Our Lady of Good Hope Catholic Church in Camden. A graveside service at Rockville Cemetery will be announced in the spring. A celebration gathering will be held at his daughter’s home, 200 West Street Extension, Rockport, following the interment. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Bob Gagnon Cancer Care Fund, C/O Pen Bay Health Care, 22 White St., Rockland, ME 04841.

Arrangements are in the care of Burpee, Carpenter & Hutchins Funeral Home, 110 Limerock St., Rockland. To share a memory or condolence with Mr. Perry’s family, please visit his Book of Memories at bchfh.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments (3)
Posted by: Steven D Bryant | Jan 15, 2014 15:12

The quote I loved best and he would say it while dancing around the room usually during a test...."If you learn anything in my class, remember one thing going forward in life. Marry for money" Loved every minute of his teaching. Class of 77



Posted by: Sandy Cameron | Jan 15, 2014 04:17

An engaging as well as entertaining instructor.  Always remember his "ody, ody, ody, ody" big numbers that went off the chalkboard and onto the classroom walls.  Getting the numbers was as much fun as it was humiliating when it was time for detention.  He definitely stands out as one of my more memorable instructors in those early days of high school at CRHS. :) So long Mr. Perry. S.C. CRHS Class of 80



Posted by: Daniel G Benson | Jan 14, 2014 19:57

He was a fun teacher. He gave you a chance if detention was warranted. He would circle 1, 2, or 3 on the black board and if you guessed the number he circled you had to stay after school.    D. B.   CRHS   Class of  1973



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