CELEBRATE MOTHER'S DAY BY HELPING THOSE MOMS WHO SMOKE BECOME TOBACCO-FREE!

By Knox County Community Health Coalition | May 10, 2012

For many kids, Mother’s Day means taking mom out to breakfast, giving her a gift, or just saying thanks.  On this special day for moms, we should also remember that a terrific way to celebrate Mother’s Day might be to pledge to give moms who currently smoke the kind of loving support, encouragement, and information that could help them to be tobacco-free before Mother’s Day next year.   

In the United States, more than 21 million adult women currently smoke, putting them at risk for heart attacks, strokes, lung cancer, emphysema and other life-threatening illnesses.  Lung cancer is the leading cancer killer among women, and smoking is attributable for 80 percent of these deaths.  Smoking also accounts for one of every five deaths from heart disease, the overall leading cause of death among women.  When women quit smoking, they improve their own health as well as the health of the people around them.  Mothers who give up smoking improve the likelihood that their children will grow-up to be tobacco-free and lead much longer and much healthier lives.

 

BELOW IS HOW THE FIGURES LOOK FOR WOMAN SMOKERS IN MAINE:

 

Smoking

Rate Among

Women

State Rank

Women

Smoking

(1 = low)

Number of Women Smokers

Annual Women Smoking Deaths

Pregnant Women Smoking Rate

State Rank Pregnant Smoking

(1 = low)

Pregnant Births Per Year

State Kids Who Have Already Lost Their Moms to Smoking

New Kids Who Lose Their Moms to Smoking Each Year

Taxes paid for

SSSI Payments to Kids With Moms Lost to Smoking (millions/yr)

Total State Health Costs to Treat Female Smokers (millions/year)

 

17.3%

34th

94,200

900

14.6%

32nd

1,800

320

40

$2.79

$249.1

 

For more information on how to quit tobacco, please contact Nancy Laite, Knox County Community Health Coalition, a local Healthy Maine Partnership nllaite2@myfairpoint.net or 236-6313 ext. 2.

 Sources: State-specific smoking rates, 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS).  National: 2010 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS).  U.S. Bureau of Census, 2010 population estimates used to compute number of women smokers.  Annual smoking deaths from the CDC’s STATE System (average annual deaths from 2000-2004).  Pregnant women state-specific smoking rates: in regular type from 2002, CDC, “Smoking During Pregnancy – United States, 1990-2002,” MMWR 53(39) October 8, 2004 http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5339.pdf; in bold type from 2005 “Trends in Smoking Before, During and After Pregnancy – Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS), United States, 31 Sites 2000-20005,”  MMWR 58 SS-4, May 29, 2009 http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/ss5804a1.htm.  National pregnant women smoking rate: National Center for Health Statistics, Health, United States, 2008.  Hyattsville, MD, 2009 (Data are for the 33 reporting areas that used the 1989 Revision of the U.S. Standard Certificate of Live Birth for data on smoking). http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus08.pdf  Births: Hamilton, B., et al., Births: Preliminary Data for 2010, National vital statistics reports 60(2), Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, November 17, 2011. Leistikow, B, et al., "Estimates of Smoking-Attributable Deaths at Ages 15-54, Motherless or Fatherless Youths, and Resulting Social Security Costs in the United States in 1994," Preventive Medicine 30(5): 353-360,May 2000, and state-specific data provided by the author.  Costs: CDC, Sustaining State Programs for Tobacco Control: Data Highlights 2006, http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/state_data/data_highlights/2006/index.htm.

 

Comments (0)
If you wish to comment, please login.