Calamity — how do we solve it?

By Jan Dolcater | Aug 05, 2014

Today our country is confronted with two situations that are going to test our wisdom and compassion. First, we have a flood of undocumented young people and children that has crossed our border, and in addition, we are faced with a very porous southern border that allows not only this group, but also drug thugs and very likely terrorists to enter at will.

It is apparent that any caring individual, particularly a parent, has sincere concerns regarding the well-being of the children involved. Fortunately many Texas churches have extended themselves as a lifeline to those in need. Likewise, other individuals and organizations have also attempted to provide assistance. All of these efforts are overwhelmed by the number of those who have crossed our border. It is essential that both of our political parties join in a concerted effort to meet the immediate needs of adequate food, shelter and health care.

Whether a joint effort to gain agreement on what to do with this current group of immigrants is attainable prior to the congressional recess is very questionable. Legislation should be passed to allow those currently here to be returned to their country. Additional measures need to be taken to prevent the President from unilaterally granting amnesty to these children. Our national budget is already hemorrhaging and we are unable to take care of those who are here legally. The influx of illegal Central Americans will increase our debt in an even more unsustainable manner.

We are told the drug traffickers, or coyotes as they are called, charge approximately $7,000 to convoy these children through Mexico. I am confused by this cost as the estimated annual wage (GNI) in US dollars, according to the World Bank is only $3,720 for El Salvador, $3,340 for Guatemala, and $2,180 for Honduras.

Where does this money come from to fund transportation through Mexico? Something is very much a miss; we need to follow the money to truly understand this problem.

It appears from recent polls that a majority of our United States citizens want to have the government maintain control of our border. We simply cannot permit the pressure from people in disadvantaged countries that want to come here to overwhelm us. Dating back to the fall of Rome, no country that failed to have border integrity has survived. We should send back those who have entered illegally to their native country as a definitive message to those governments that we cannot have such a migration and this current method of entry will not insure amnesty. All who wish to come to our country cannot come as they wish.

There are business interests, like the Chamber of Commerce, that claim we need low wage undocumented aliens due to the lack of Americans who will take these jobs. If the welfare requirements were more stringent many of those that are currently gaming the system for “easy money” would be forced to fill this labor need. We must not endanger the needs of our citizens that need assistance.

Another View is contributed by a group of concerned citizens, who meet each week to discuss events of public interest.

Comments (1)
Posted by: paula sutton | Aug 07, 2014 06:46

When recently confronted with the question from a ten year old about why they should buckle up their seat belt because "Its the law", when  our Government is letting thousands cross our borders illegally I must admit I had no decent answer for the child.  How can we ask our citizens to follow the law when our own Government blatantly does not?

How knowledgeable ten year olds are these days.



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