Architect images show look of proposed five-story hotel

By Daniel Dunkle | Apr 28, 2014
Source: Rockland Code Office This computer-generated image on file at City Hall shows the proposed five-story hotel from the corner of Main and Park streets.

Rockland — Images on file at City Hall show how the proposed five-story hotel may look in context with the surrounding neighborhood.

Neighbors and members of the public will once again have an opportunity to sound off on plans for a five-story hotel at 250 Main St. Tuesday, May 20, at 5:15 p.m. at City Hall.

The Planning Board has found the application for the 26-room hotel complete. The project has been proposed by Lyman-Morse Boatbuilding, though the application for site plan review is filed under the name ADZ Properties.

The hotel would occupy the corner of Main and Pleasant streets, where the Hollydachs building was torn down in September 2010.

The project is estimated to cost $2.9 million, according to paperwork on file at the Rockland Code Office, and is expected to be completed by June 2015.

Parking for the hotel will be located on the adjacent block, between Park and Pleasant streets, through a lease being finalized with Maine State Department of Transportation, according to documents at city hall. "The 30-space parking lot can be accessed from Union Street through the Midcoast Mental Health Center. A second access route would be provided through 70 Park St., near Eastern Tire."

A previous plan for parking off Brick Street near the railroad tracks drew opposition from neighbors in February and would have required a zone change.

The building plan has been changed to a hotel. It was originally approved in 2010 as a five-story mixed use building for retail, offices and condominiums. After doing some work on the foundation of the building, Lyman-Morse did not complete the project and the previous building permit expired.

Courier Publications News Director Daniel Dunkle can be reached at 594-4401 ext. 122, or ddunkle@courierpublicationsllc.com.

(Source: Rockland Code Office)
The five-story hotel proposed for 250 Main St. in Rockland as seen looking north on Main Street. (Source: Rockland Code Office)
Comments (12)
Posted by: Jeff Grinnell | Apr 29, 2014 23:00

I like it...build it. Makes a nice mix and will add great tax base and a few jobs. And why do people keep asking how much its going to cost to stay there..what does that matter...Charge more and people with the money will spend it cause it has to be good...to bad it wasn't right on the water with a nice pier and floats...Go big or go home!



Posted by: Drucinda Woodman | Apr 29, 2014 14:27

(Stuart Smith's TALL motel is smack dab in the SoRo residential area and it will cut off the ocean & harbor view from many spots!!) This 5 story Main St building doesn't 'fit in' and looks BIG CITY to me.Yuck!!

 



Posted by: James York | Apr 29, 2014 13:36

I would welcome the tax revenue this would bring to the city, not to mention a 21st century look to the to the southend of Main St.  For some, I suppose, the look of the Mrytle and the Time-Out is what the developers should be aiming for?  This is a Main St building, not plum in the middle of the residential southend.



Posted by: Amy Files | Apr 29, 2014 10:06

The Public Hearing is on May 20th. To connect with other concerned residents: https://www.facebook.com/weloveourtown

If you are a Rockland resident -- please voice your concerns to the Planning Board. If they don't hear from you they will approve this "as-is." The Downtown zone that the building is in stipulates that it needs to be compatible with surrounding scale and use. No one can rightly argue that a 5 or 6 story building is compatible with the scale of the surrounding residential homes.



Posted by: Janis J Gilley | Apr 29, 2014 09:17

The proposed building is not in keeping with the appearance of the City of Rockland, nor of the midcoast area. I agree that it is not an attractive building, to say the least. My guess is that it was designed "in house" by the company. The builders need to hire one of the many very good mid-coast architects,  who are known for the fine projects done specifically for our area in order to make this an appropriate project.



Posted by: lorrie landsberg | Apr 29, 2014 08:44

The architecture as shown is an eyesore, this building needs warmth and charm.



Posted by: Francis Mazzeo, Jr. | Apr 29, 2014 08:31

That almost makes the run down rental next to me look good.



Posted by: Amy Knowles | Apr 29, 2014 08:10

As a designer I find the Architecture does not fit into our New England landscape.  Also, a three story building is more appropriate.

 



Posted by: Valerie Wass | Apr 29, 2014 08:01

It sticks out like a sore thumb.  Not an appropriate place for such a monstrosity of a building.  If there were more tall buildings around, it would fit in nicely but that.....I am all in favor of building up Rockland but it a way that best suits this city.  Stuart Smith has a wonderful idea of a hotel/motel at the South End which will enhance this area.

 

 



Posted by: Valerie Wass | Apr 29, 2014 07:58

Wondering why it doesn't mention hotel rooms but rather condo's on the 3rd, 4th and 5th floors.

 

http://www.lymanmorse.com/250-Main-Rockland

 

Also, if you take a look at the drawings, where is the smokestack for Rock City?

Is this going to be a 26 room hotel as the city is suggesting or more condo's?



Posted by: Reggie Montgomery | Apr 28, 2014 22:52

That's ugly! Seems like they could design something that fits in a bit better.



Posted by: David E Myslabodski | Apr 28, 2014 20:51

Nice 75 feet high climbing wall!



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Dan Dunkle
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Daniel Dunkle is editor of The Courier-Gazette and news director for Courier Publications. He lives in Rockland with his wife, Christine, who also works for Courier Publications, and two children.

Dunkle has previously served as editor of The Republican Journal in Belfast. He has worked as a reporter and photographer in the Midcoast for 15 years.

 

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